About your Search

20110701
20110731
SHOW
STATION
WHUT (Howard University Television) 26
KQED (PBS) 15
WETA 13
KRCB (PBS) 7
WMPT (PBS) 7
LANGUAGE
English 68
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 68 (some duplicates have been removed)
play the role of a talyst. and you know what, when i do my research in india and pakistan, i find people there telling me that you know the way forward is going to be that you people in the west, you muslims living in the west, in north america and europe, you guys might be pave approximating the way. i said really, do you really want us to show you the way, we have a different economic system, different experience. said you can say whatever you want but whatever light are you going to shine on kick-starting the tradition is going to help us. we might not take everything you say. but we are too caught up in our indonesian struggles. and the other thing, charlie that we have in this country. we have possibly the most extraordinary resources, literal resources on islam and muss lim societies that no other country in the world has. e lrary at chicago, harvard's major library, princeton's library has terials an literary resources in arabi, petitionian, turkish, in every language. we have experts that can tell y about details about practices of islam in indonesia to timbuktu. and but t
ambassador to india. i ew none of the that. but i had the chance charlie to thank him from the bottom of my heart. he changed my lynch. and i have a son who i a teacher. teachesnglish in high school. and i'm so proud that that's what he's doing, so proud that he is having that kind of affect on the students he's teaching. and having, making his mark as a citizen, as a human being that way. >> charlie any regrets? >> me? >> charlie: yes. >> no. >> charlie: no. >> oh, some, of course. >> charlie: no great obsession, there's no great goal, there was no great sort of untain that you didn't climb. >> the best decision i ever made was to go to washington to though a job i had here in new york, good job, to the winds and go to washington in. new kennedy administration. when he said ask not what your country can do for you but wt youcan do for your country. i took that to hea. i went down and got a job at the usia when edward meryl was thee and opened upy life beyond journalism for me. at's when i found the photographs taken after the flood and i want to read more bit. i took books o and they d
of flows fundamentals. markets, marts, azil, india growth terms of a underdeveloped and the from that thmarkets. have trillion of dollars worth reserves whereas the countries are in nations so standpoints the countries are in going next five opposed to the developed. >> gillian? >> one of the most intresting things that week when that it the u.s. debt from a.a.a. that it ratings of american unchanged. the something you seeing in market the markets risk attacks is than some of american similar patent well. unusual. what moodies what you are rkets is a investors are acally, the mpletely fantastic west. run companies th the aren't run the about corporate government. everything els it's about political risk about everything ee. that the used to to emerging people this country but we don't political risks unedictably >> bill what is going to who hold us treasures. >> how are they going to get there money. >> well, they've got to get problem, in treasuries is that downgraded by rating standard & that the goes up. it's hard to know how much, i would suggest an actual downgrade debt woul
of india, ford of china. but henry in order set ford up that way because he wanted t participate in the economies, not only provide people with great cars andruck but al is he be part ofñr the fabric of te economy in every part of which we operate. but he never anticipated they would operate completely independently. thereñ2hu8zÑi no syner and yet e were competing with the best anotigr reallyñr important thini found was thatñr because of our cost structure and the agreements we had we hadÑi made with usa, we uld not make kawrltzçó in the unitedtates. that's why we were focusing on usv's and trucks. if youÑi want toÑi pick it up, e weren't making cars them. we wereñr losingÑi money on alle brkn and a the models. and my first forecast thatÑi i shared in 2006 was a $17 billion loss for the year for 2006.çóñr plan andñr we needed to mov decisively. >> charlie: there's a story which has been repeated often. you're in a meeting with some of the executives who report to you and you saido em, are we doing anything wrong or mething like that. and they nobody raised their
enough. it's one that has a lot of acceptance in a lot of the world which china, india, brazil, and south africa accept make it work. >> rose: in your opinion china, >> >> yes. >> rose: you came away with what sense of their ambition? >> well, this is clearly a country with an enormous national will to... >> rose: solve internal problems? >> to develop, to become wealthy and powerful and to overcome what they see as a century and a half of national humiliation at the hands of the west. that's a huge drive. how it does that i think this is a country which sees many options and could go several different ways. i mean, the one thing almost everyone you speak in china agrees on the it's not going to have the same system in 20 year's time that it has today. whereas in the united states you think you have basically the same system that you've had for a few centuries and more. >> i think ai wei wei had said this. that you do not expect reform to comele from the generation that's now takingower that replaces hu jintao and wen jiabao but you expect genuine reform to come from the next generation,
in the world because you've got these rising powers, china, india, brazil, but we don't -- >> but we don't -- what they antarctica late, what we don't yet know is what they stand for. what is their big idea. what are these now powers going to bring to the world. so everybody is still lookinto america for the leadership and ashomas sa america is still the tent pole but europeans and everyone, i think, are asking can where is u.s. headed it cannot gone with these levels of deficits and debt. mething has to be done but the one thing president obama has not articulated is some broad vision for the united states to compete in the world. energy is one very obvious area tha tom writes a lot about. i was recently in copenhagen, in copenhagen they are now heeding the entire city this winter, last winter by burning their own gar badge. there are dramatic changes going on. why is green technolog being lead by scandinavia, by asia. and that vision is just lacking. >> let me open that up with everybody. the idea of obama leadership, i mean as did has said is not acted boldly where he might have want
as opped to fundamentals. the emerging markets, developing markets, gynea-- china, brazil, india all have better growth prospects in terms of a rather underdeveloped consumer sector and the ability to grow from that standpoint versus the developed markets. in addition they have trillions of dollars worth of reserves whereas the developed countries are in hawk to those nations so from those standpoints the developing countries are in much better shape going forward over the next five to ten years as opposed to the developed. >> gillian? >> onef the most interesting things that moodies said this week when it gave warning that it might downgrade the u.s. debt fm aaa was that it was leaving the ratings of companies, large american companies unchanged. and essentially the underlying, somethg you are already seeing in market prices where in the markets right now the risk attacks to sereign debt is actually higher than some of the big, solid american companies or similar patent in europe as well. and that's very unusual. but essentially what moodies was saying and what you are seeing in the mark
of china and india and the economic growth of those emerging nations. it has to do with the fact that technology s no respect for boundaries which we are discovering in the middle east right now, right. >> absolutely. >> where do you come down on that in terms of america because you're leaving america. >> yh. america h ha great natural resources, huge amount of land and that's been extremely important in its growth. but it also has respeed science and innovation. and we see great growth areas. i mean california and in the boston area in particularly and i think america recognizeds the importance of human capital. i think that's intellectual capital and the generation of ideas. but it needs more nurturing. i mean science education in the u.s. is not up to scratch. >> what does that mean not up to scratch. >> it'just not generating enough educated individuals either those that would actually go into science which is what we're mainly talking about here, but also producing an educated population who can actually coribute making decisions in democracy that are increasingly going to
that secretary clinton took her first trip as secretary of state to asia. >> rose: and she's back in india as we speak. since dean rusk in 1961. and we have really engaged... they want u.s. presence. i think the asians want to see the unitedtates engaged and, by the way, they want us to manage the relationship with china in a positive constructive way. >> rose: can the chinese fear that we're... want to be too big a player in the region and looking the secretary speech in vietnam, for example? >> that's a gd questionnd one that's debated in china and i'd answer it this way. the chinese recognize-- and i've spent a lot of time with the leaders of china over the last too and a half years and that's a very interesting article published boy their state counselor and for your viewers who dot have the chinese foreign ministry on their list serve, you can rea about this in the last chapter of henry kissinger's book "on china." a fascinating discussion. >> rose: he's the most prominent person in chinese foreign policy and he was a participant in the dialogues. >> exactly. so there's a debate in china a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 68 (some duplicates have been removed)